September 17, 2013

Caregiver support.

I was hired to do this drawing for a local Caregivers Support Group - this particular group is involved with caring for the elderly. It's important to have support when you care for others, for it can be a heavy load. It's good to be able to ask for help too.


I donated the illustration.

If you are a caregiver, what do you do for support?



15 comments:

  1. Back in Ontario I was in the field. It was hard seeing families who were breaking under the stress of caring for parents.. and sometimes their own kids too. So many supports out there, and I hope people learn more about them and utilize them.

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    1. This group wanted to advertise with a poster, because as you point out, may caregivers do not realize there are support networks out there.

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  2. As a newly minted, albeit temporary (hopefully) caregiver, the hardest (and most humbling) part of this was asking for and accepting help. It's not easy, but oh so necessary.

    Love the illustration and that you donated it. Jc, you totally rock.

    Sherree

    (I had to post anonymously, it wouldn't let me post any other way).

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    1. I'm glad you were able to ask for help. It's true it's not easy. Also glad Blogger finally let you post your comment! Thanks for persevering!

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  3. Thank you so much for doing this illustration, JC.

    Last week, I found my mother unconscious and had to have her taken to the hospital. It was one of THE MOST FRIGHTENING moments of my life. Although I had done a lot of things on my own before, I decided this time I was not going to go it alone. So I called on the help of friends to provide support, and now they provide relief when I can. They also give me places to go when I need some downtime. Also? I called on my online friends, who sent thoughts, prayers, juju, whatever they wanted. It is so crucial to have that support in your life. To be active. To remember you are a person, too.

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    1. Oh man. I can see how that would be totally frightening. I agree that the online community can be as supportive (if not more in some cases) as IRL life friends and family. And also support from those who are living through the same thing you are. And yes, yes, yes - you are a person too.

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  4. I love this drawing.

    I work for the professional development division of a university and we offer a Caregiving Essentials program that covers so much for professional and at-home caregivers. The biggest and most important topic in the program is SUPPORT. Both for the caregiver and the one receiving the care. We all need support, and this drawing portrays that need so perfectly.

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    1. I'm so glad! Do you have a link you can share?

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  5. I believe it is important for children to understand Alzheimer's disease so they can still interact lovingly with family members who have this disease. I am a 17 year old college junior, Alzheimer's researcher, and Alzheimer's advocate.I grew up as a caregiver to my great grandmother who had Alzheimer's disease. After her death, I founded a nonprofit organization that has distributed over 24,000 puzzles to Alzheimer's facilities. Recently, the book I coauthored explaining Alzheimer's disease to children became available on Amazon.My hope was to provide some helpful coping mechanisms to the many children dealing with Alzheimer's disease among their family members. 50 percent of the profits from this book will go to Alzheimer's causes. I think this book could help a lot of children and families."Why Did Grandma Put Her Underwear in Refrigerator? A Book Explaining Alzheimer's Disease to Children." http://amzn.to/13FYYxh

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  6. What a great illustration! I'm the caretaker for my 92 yr. old mom who has Alzheimer's. My husband helps me when he can and I have wonderful support on Twitter and Instagram.

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  7. I couldn't help but follow this thread. Before I moved to a new province in July, I worked in the seniors field in Ontario. I just wanted to put a little more info..maybe everyone knows but maybe someone doesn't.

    In Ontario contact your CCAC or your CCAC Case Manager if your parents have one. They can give you contacts. Know what you need, and ask for it. Recharge is a great program that offers respite in the GTA. I used to work for VON, and they had a volunteer visiting program. I did that program as well as the mental health volunteer visiting program (seniors living with bi-polar, etc...) That's where they match your parent up with a volunteer who visits 1x week for 2-3 hours. It's a little bit of a break to sleep or go shop without worrying. The waitlist probably is a bit by now..

    My biggest thing I used to tell people is advocate for yourself and your loved one. It's hard, but you need to advocate so you do not suffer care giver burnout.. ONce that happens there are so many negative side effects.

    Ask the professionals for what you need cuz everyone is different due to diagnosis, personality, cultural background, etc....

    I miss the field.....hopefully new beginnings here will be just as good here.

    I hope that helps someone who stops by here.



    I wish I was still in the field.. So many tidbits of info in my head and so many contacts to give :) ....

    By the way, I love that book and have sent the link to my contacts in Ontario.


    ....I miss my job. New beginnings here so we'll see what happens.

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    1. You obviously have a lot of expertise to share and a great passion for what you do. I hope you can resume it wherever you end up, or find a way to share it with those who need it.

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  8. That's a very nice drawing and an even nicer gesture. Simple and direct: all the heart encapsulated with a few lines. A rather appealing style there as well. This is how caregiving should be like too—simple and direct. Just reaching out to those who have been weakened and providing to their needs. End of story.

    Theodore @ Live-In Comfort

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    1. Thanks for saying that. I agree the simple line style goes well with the topic - simple, direct, familiar and unassuming.

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Cuz You Rocketh.